Disaster Preparedness: What To Do in the Event of An Emergency

Disaster Preparedness: What To Do in the Event of An Emergency

When disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, floods, or fires strike a community, the impact reaches not only people but also resident livestock and companion animals. The impact on animals can include animals getting stranded and needing rescue, or permanent separation of companion animals from their owners or fosters.

Recent disasters highlighted the need for emergency response plans that include provisions for pet evacuations and to communicate relevant information to our fosters and volunteers. It is important for the Animal Emergency Preparedness Plan to be flexible and scalable, providing the protocols needed in the event of any disaster.

What To Do in the Event of An Emergency

If you have to evacuate please take all pets in the home, including foster pets. If it’s not safe for you to remain in your home, then it is not safe for the pets in your home to remain either.

Evacuate early. Don’t wait for an emergency evacuation order. Evacuating before conditions become severe will keep everyone safer and make the process less stressful.

Be Prepared!

1.    Check for and prevent any hazards that may already exist in your home such as:

  • Propane tanks – ensure they are safely kept
  • Monitor candles and heat emitting appliances such as ovens, stove, or clothes iron
  • Don’t overload electrical outlets
  • Test smoke alarms frequently to ensure they are in working order
  • Purchase a fire extinguisher and learn how to use it
  • Prevent carbon monoxide leaks by having your HVAC system, water heater, and other appliances that use gas, oil, or coal serviced by a professional every year
  • Make sure to always keep anything that gives off heat at least 3 feet away from flammable materials or items
  • If you have a fireplace, make sure your chimney is checked and cleaned by a professional once a year. Use a metal or glass screen that is large enough to prevent escaping embers
  • Check the testing labels on all major appliances that indicate you purchased them in safe working order. You may not find testing labels on older appliances, so consider whether it’s time to replace them or have them checked by a professional.
  • Avoid cluttering debris or junk near a furnace, heater or nay heat source

2.    Make sure that all information on identification tags and microchips are current and that both include your cell phone number and the contact information of a backup contact.

3.    Prepare a disaster kit that includes:

  • Food & water for at least 5 days
  • Bowls
  • Manual can opener
  • Medications and vet records
  • Litter, litter boxes and/or poopie bags
  • Harnesses, collars with tags (preferably martingale collars so your dog can’t “back out” of the collar in fear), leashes and crates/carriers

4.    In the event another foster home is needed, write down anything a temporary foster may need to know about your pet(s) and foster pet(s) including behavior, feeding times, any medical issues, medication, etc.

5.    Develop an evacuation transport plan including where pets will immediately go in an emergency (car, neighbor’s house, etc). Determine the number of crates or carriers needed, and an emergency destination (Red Cross or FEMA shelter, family or friend’s house, vet’s office, etc.).

  • Contact hotels/motels that are at least 50 miles from you to see if they take pets during an emergency.
  • Other essential supplies to store in a secure room in the home:
    • Nonperishable food
    • Bottled water
    • Battery-powered radios
    • First-aid supplies
    • Flashlights
    • Batteries
    • Duct tape
    • Plastic sheeting
    • Plastic garbage bags

Fires and Emergency Situations in the Home

In the event of a fire or emergency situation, call 9-1-1 immediately! Then:

  • Notify all people in your home as soon as possible by sounding any form of alarm- air horn, whistle, smoke alarm, or verbal.
  • Provide instructions to all occupants of the home as to where to exit and where to go once they exit the home.
  • Once all occupants including pets in the home are safe and emergency personnel have arrived on the scene, contact a friend or family member to notify them of the emergency and your location. Also provide an alternate contact number for anyone who is with you.

Under no circumstances should you attempt to fight a fire that has passed the incipient stage (that which can be put out with a single fire extinguisher), nor should you attempt to enter a burning building to conduct search and rescue. These actions should be left to emergency services professionals who have the necessary training, equipment, and experience (such as the fire department or emergency medical professionals). Untrained individuals may endanger themselves and/or those they are trying to rescue.

Evacuation Routes

Develop an evacuation route plan of your home, assign a Designated Assembly Area or Evacuation Site for your home.

  • Designated Assembly Area (DAA) is an outside location at least 50 feet from the building, away from roads and walkways used by emergency vehicles
  • Evacuation Site (ES) a building in close proximity to the evacuated building that will provide protection from the weather or other elements in the case of a prolonged evacuation.

If an emergency occurs while at home or work, local emergency personnel will instruct and direct you to the nearest DAA or ES.

Discuss all emergency evacuation plans with all members of your household.

  • Appoint 1-2 people responsible for evacuation assistance in your home.
  • In the event that a fire/emergency alarm is sounded or instructions for evacuation are given:
    • Everyone should immediately exit the premises/building(s) at the nearest exits, as shown in the escape route
    • Meet as soon as possible at the Designated Assembly Area.
    • The people responsible for evacuation are to check all rooms for occupants and pets.
    • Once a room has been checked and cleared, close the door to that room, but leave it unlocked. This will decrease the chances of a fire spreading.
    • Leave home exit doors open to allow any pets that may remain to escape to the outdoors. If you must, break a window to the room where you think pets may be hiding.

Securing Property and Equipment

In the event that evacuation of the premises is necessary make sure that gas mains, electricity breaker boxes and water mains are shut off.  Determine who in your home will be responsible for shutting off this equipment in your home.

Accounting for members of your household after an evacuation

Once a home evacuation has occurred to an evacuation site, an adult should account for each person and pet that was in the home and report this to emergency personnel.

Home Evacuation Re-entry

Once your home has been evacuated, do not re-enter it for any reason. All members of the home should remain at the Designated Assembly Areas or Evacuation Sites until the fire department or other emergency response agency notifies you that either it is safe to re-enter, or if relocation to a new location is discussed and determined.

Sheltering in Place: When not to evacuate

In the event of an emergency where authorities may determine that it is safer to remain where you are rather than evacuate in such instances as chemical, biological, or radiological contaminates have been released into the environment in such quantity and/or proximity to your home, please follow all instructions by emergency personnel and do the following:

  • Immediately lock exterior doors and close windows, doggy doors, and air vents.
  • Turn off, seal, or disable all fans, heating and air conditioning systems, and clothes dryers, especially those systems that automatically provide for exchange of inside air with outside air.
  • If there is a danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains.
  • Ensure all pets are inside.

If you have a room you can designate as a “safe room,” put your emergency supplies in that room in advance. A safe room is a room that has no windows or exposure to the outside such as a walk-in closet, bathroom, basement or underground shelter.  Bring all supplies listed above (pet crate and supplies, any medications and a supply of pet food and water inside watertight containers, along with your other emergency supplies.) If there is an open fireplace, vent, pet door or similar opening in the house, close it off with plastic sheeting and strong tape.

Write down the names of everyone in the home and inform emergency personnel outside of the building of who is in the room. Listen to the radio, monitor TV, phone or check Facebook updates. Do not come out until you know it’s safe and have been instructed to do so by emergency personnel.

Reporting Emergency Situations

All emergency situations must be reported as soon as possible. Emergency situations may include but are not limited to fires, earthquakes, floods, vehicle accidents during animal transport, injuries incurred by human or animal from bites and animal injuries incurred during physical exercise.

We want to ensure all members of your home are safe and accounted for in case of an emergency – both people and pets. For more information and tips on emergency situations, please visit the Red Cross and FEMA web sites. Also, please contact your local animal shelter and discuss their emergency plans for animal evacuations. You should also contact neighbors, family and friends to discuss emergency plans.

 

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Untangling Pet CBD


confused_dog1.jpg

Marijuana. Cannabis. It used to be the drug of hippies and college kids. Now legalized in 30 states and the District of Columbia, it’s not so taboo any more. However, it is still very new in this regard, especially when it comes to medicinal use and regulatory issues.

Nevertheless, the increasing use of cannabis for medical purposes has spawned a budding industry. With this, comes a lot of confusion for consumers who are interested in exploring the health benefits of cannabis for both themselves and their pets.

For simplicity’s sake, we’ll break down the most common compound for medicinal marijuana: Cannabidiol (CBD).

What is CBD?
Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major constituent of the cannabis plant. It is a cannabis compound that has significant medical benefits, but does not make people feel “stoned” like Phytocannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

CBD doesn’t activate the brain’s cannabinoid receptors in the same manner as THC. It does however, target a wide variety of proteins in the brain and nervous system that regulate cell activities. By interacting with the brain’s signaling systems in various ways, it can provide relief from pain, anxiety, and nausea. Beyond our brains, CBD may benefit our bones and immune systems and work broadly throughout the body as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, which may help protect cells from damages associated with neurodegenerative diseases. It has proven to have the same effect on our pet.

What are the differences between 250mg, 500mg and 1000mg of CBD?
You will likely see various pet CBD products with varying amounts of CBD (in mg). What does this mean? It’s basically the potency. 250mg is a low-potency oil while 1000mg is a high potency oil. It also means the percentage of actual CBD that is in the product.

For example: A single serving of the 250mg (30 mL) bottle is equivalent to 15 drops of oil. which translates to a 7mg dose of CBD. Pet owners may not even use a full dose though, as your pet can find relief with as little as 5-7 drops of oil, which translates to about a 3mg dose. However, make sure to talk to your vet prior to starting a CBD regiment for your pet, and always check dosing amounts as it applies to the size of your pet.

While the perception is the higher the potency, the more effective the product, which is not altogether untrue; CBD product potency is really about the degree to which CBD can effect a dog’s health. It is directly related to the ability of that CBD product to be absorbed, transported and made available to individual receptor sites. This is primarily determined by the method of delivery:

  • Sublingual- under the tongue. When administered this way, the cannabinoids come into close contact with blood-rich tissues in the mouth and are immediately absorbed into the bloodstream. Because of this, sublingual administration is considered the best choice of dosing.

  • Oral ingestion from treats or on food. While not as effective as sublingual administration, putting some CBD oil in your pet’s food is less “invasive”. However, it is possible that a percentage of the original stated dose is lost due to the presence of digestive enzymes and stomach acids. This results in a much lower bio-availability of active cannabinoids and therefore, lowers the absorption rate.

Full spectrum CBD, such as PPITS Pet CBD, contains an array of non-intoxicating cannabinoids such as cannabidiol (CBD), Cannabichromene (CBC), Cannabigerol (CBG), Cannabinol (CBN), Cannabidivarin (CBDV) just to name a few. All have shown to help with conditions such as anxiety, cancer, inflammation, seizures, diabetes, arthritis, pain, and nausea to name a few. When combined, all the cannabinoids and terpenes work together in synergy, which ultimately make it a more effective product.

PAW PRINTS IN THE SAND ANIMAL RESCUE ANNOUNCES ITS SENIORS FOR SENIORS FOSTER PROGRAM

PAW PRINTS IN THE SAND ANIMAL RESCUE ANNOUNCES ITS SENIORS FOR SENIORS FOSTER PROGRAM

S4S Image.jpgThe Program is Designed to Help Save and Enrich Lives by Rescuing Senior Shelter Pets and Giving Senior Citizens in Retirement Homes and Assisted Living Facilities the Opportunity to Foster and Care for Them.

Newport Beach, Calif. – November 6, 2018 – In celebration of National Senior Pet Month, Paw Prints in the Sand Animal Rescue today announced its new Seniors for Seniors Foster Program. The program is designed to rescue senior pets in high-kill shelters and place them in foster care with residents in retirement homes and assisted living facilities, while they await adoption.

The new program is an extension of “Murray’s Purpose”,  which the rescue developed in memory of Murray, a 12-year-old mastiff who suffered from advanced lymphoma. Murray was in deadly Carson Shelter and scheduled to be euthanized. Paw Prints in the Sand rescued him so he could live out the rest of his days with love, care and comfort.

According to the ASPCA, every year, an estimated 1.5 million animals euthanized in our nation’s shelter system. A large portion of those animals are adult or senior pets.

In addition, senior citizens in retirement homes and assisted living facilities often suffer from loneliness, isolation, depression, and anxiety. Research shows that owning a pet improves a senior citizen’s overall quality of life by providing physical, emotional and social benefits.

“There’s no question about the power of unconditional love,” stated Kelly Reeves, president and co-founder of Paw Prints in the Sand. “Our goal is to help animals and humans alike by reducing the number of senior pets in our shelters while enriching the lives of senior citizens in our community, who would get to enjoy the many benefits of caring for a rescue pet.”

As part of the program, Paw Prints in the Sand aims to partner with local senior citizen homes and assisted living facilities in Southern California. The program would allow multiple residents to participate in the love and care of a senior pet. However, one resident would also be allowed to take the responsibility of fostering a pet on his or her own if they chose to do so.

 As part of its Foster Program, Paw Prints in the Sand covers all medical costs and supplies and provides all other supplies including food, bedding, leashes and collars, crates, toys, litter and litter boxes (for cats), etc. All you have to do is care.

For more information about Paw Prints in the Sand, its mission and other programs, please visit www.pawprintsinthesand.org. Click here to make a donation or to become a program sponsor.

About Paw Prints in the Sand Paw Prints in the Sand Animal Rescue is a non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing, rehoming and rehabilitating abused, abandoned, neglected and stray companion animals. Virtually all donated funds go directly towards the care of the animals. Headquartered in Orange County, California, Paw Prints in the Sand is an all-volunteer, all-foster organization committed to placing animals in loving, responsible, committed forever homes.

Paw Prints in the Sand raises funds through events, donations, and continuing contributions from its supporters. For more information or to make a donation, visit the organizations Web site at www.pawprintsinthesand.org. You can also visit PPITS on Facebook and Instagram @PPITSresq, and on Twitter @PPITSRescue

 

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PAW PRINTS IN THE SAND LAUNCHES THE ‘FROM SHELTER TO SERVICE’ PROGRAM

PAW PRINTS IN THE SAND LAUNCHES THE ‘FROM SHELTER TO SERVICE’ PROGRAM

The Organization Will Work to Help Combat Veterans and People with Disabilities While Reducing Shelter Overpopulation

Newport Beach, Calif., – February 21, 2018 – Paw Prints in the Sand Animal Rescue, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit animal welfare organization, today announced its new ‘From Shelter to Service’ Program. The program is designed to rescue eligible dogs from high kill shelters that are at risk of euthanasia and train them to become service dogs for combat veterans who suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). The program will also help people with certain health conditions that require them to have a service dog such as diabetes, epilepsy, paralysis, and nerve and neurological disorders. An example of this is Buttercup.

Once an eligible dog is rescued, Paw Prints in the Sand will provide medical care and sterilization as needed prior to a dog entering a service dog training program. The rescue will work with local dog trainers including The Patriotic Service Dog Foundation, Redefined Dog Training, and David Utter.

An estimated 460,000 veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan war alone, struggle with PTSD or TBI, which can lead to sleeplessness, depression, anger, anxiety and isolation. Furthermore, more than 3.9 million dogs enter our nation’s shelter system on an annual basis. 1.2 million of those dogs are euthanized. The goal of this program is to help reduce those numbers and help those who need it most.

“We have always been dedicated to reducing shelter overpopulation, but felt that we could always do more, especially for the men and women who have served this great country,” stated Kelly Reeves, president of Paw Prints in the Sand. “We are excited to work with our veterans and excellent trainers while taking opportunity to save more lives- both humans and dogs.”

“Every day, 22 of our nation’s heroes take their own lives due to the effects of PTSD and TBI. This is unconscionable for America- the world’s greatest nation,” said Tom Tackett, founder of the Patriotic Service Dog Foundation. “Aligning with Paw Prints in the Sand will better our respective efforts to reduce the unfortunate numbers that we are fighting against.”

About Paw Prints in the Sand
Paw Prints in the Sand Animal Rescue is a charitable non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing, rehoming and rehabilitating abused, abandoned, neglected and stray companion animals. Virtually all donated funds go directly towards the care of the animals. Headquartered in Orange County, California, Paw Prints in the Sand is an all-volunteer, all-foster organization committed to placing animals in loving, responsible, committed forever homes.

Paw Prints in the Sand raises funds through events, donations, and continuing contributions from its supporters. For more information or to make a donation, visit the organizations Web site at www.pawprintsinthesand.org. You can also visit PPITS on Facebook and Instagram @PPITSresq, and on Twitter @PPITSRescue

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PAW PRINTS IN THE SAND ANNOUNCES ‘MURRAY’S PURPOSE’, A NEW PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK SENIOR SHELTER PETS

PAW PRINTS IN THE SAND ANNOUNCES ‘MURRAY’S PURPOSE’, A NEW PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK SENIOR SHELTER PETS

The Program is Designed to Save Late-Stage Senior Pets in Southern California Kill Shelters and Provide Them with Hospice Care

 Newport Beach, Calif., – January 23, 2018 – Paw Prints in the Sand Animal Rescue, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit animal welfare organization, today announced Murray’s Purpose, a new program dedicated to providing hospice care for at-risk senior pets in local Southern California kill shelters.

Murray’s Purpose was developed in memory of Murray, a 12-year-old mastiff who suffered from advanced lymphoma. Murray was in deadly Carson Shelter and scheduled to be euthanized. Paw Prints in the Sand rescued him so he could live out the rest of his days with love, care and comfort.

Sadly, senior pets make up the bulk of the 1.2 million animals that are put to death annually in our nation’s shelter system. This is mainly because they are often deemed “unadoptable”, and the shelters want to make room for younger pets that are typically more desirable and adoptable.

“Senior pets have always had a place in our hearts. These are pets that had a home until they got old and their health deteriorated and were surrendered to a shelter to die alone, confused and afraid,” stated Kelly Reeves, president and co-founder of Paw Prints in the Sand. “Murray’s Purpose will help save more of these senior pets and give them the second chance that they deserve and the opportunity to live out their sunset days or years with love, care, comfort, and dignity.”

In addition to saving more senior pets, Paw Prints in the Sand aims to educate the public on the benefits of adopting a senior pet including the fact they are much mellower; they are typically house-trained, and still they have so much love to give!

Paw Prints in the Sand is actively looking for hospice care fosters in Southern California under the Murray’s Purpose Program. The rescue covers all medical costs and provides all food and supplies. For more information on the rescue’s foster program, please visit www.pawprintsinthesand.org/foster.

Click here to make a donation or to be a program sponsor.

About Paw Prints in the Sand
Paw Prints in the Sand Animal Rescue is a non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing, rehoming and rehabilitating abused, abandoned, neglected and stray companion animals. Virtually all donated funds go directly towards the care of the animals. Headquartered in Orange County, California, Paw Prints in the Sand is an all-volunteer, all-foster organization committed to placing animals in loving, responsible, committed forever homes.

Paw Prints in the Sand raises funds through events, donations, and continuing contributions from its supporters. For more information or to make a donation, visit the organizations Web site at www.pawprintsinthesand.org. You can also visit PPITS on Facebook and Instagram @PPITSresq, and on Twitter @PPITSRescue

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Media Contact:
Kelly Reeves
KLR Communications
kellyr@klrpr.com
949-769-3663